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Welcome to Business Continuity Partners of the West

At BCPWest, we are passionate about providing you with process continuity planning for any potential crisis or disaster!

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ALL ABOUT PREPAREDNESS


Call it business continuity, emergency readiness, disaster preparedness, whatever term you’d like. Disaster planning starts with process continuity planning!

A crisis or disaster can be anything that will cause your business to stall at a minimum or crash at worst. Anything can be called a ‘crisis or disaster’. Big or small. These can be natural (e.g., floods, tornados); internet/web related (e.g., viral or malicious attacks on website/social media); monetary (e.g., embezzlement); technical (e.g., major machines break down or are damaged maliciously); or man-made (e.g., robbery).

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WHY YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS TO PREPARE


Forty percent of businesses do not reopen after a disaster and another 25 percent fail within one year according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Similar statistics from the United States Small Business Administration indicate over 90 percent of businesses fail within two years after being struck by a disaster.

The important thing is to be ready or your business will come to a screeching halt. It’s our mission to get you beyond thinking about preparedness and enable you to complete the actual process. We even have an easy-to-use tool to help you.

Small Businesses Not Reopened After Disaster40%
Businesses Failed After One Year of Disaster25%
Businesses Failed After Two Years of Disaster90%
  It’s not a matter of IF. It’s a matter of WHEN.  

There is Good News!

The good news is you can calmly work on preparedness before disaster strikes by utilizing your internal team of employees and external business teams of Banker, Insurance Agent, CPA and Lawyer. They are your partners in keeping your business going in the midst of a crisis.

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Explore these free resources:

Find out how you will see the need for crisis preparation based on your results from these checklists or surveys

 

Top 10 Questions

At BCPW we ask questions; the right questions for YOUR business. Questions that help you reduce risk and better plan for the future and for success. Questions that help protect your business and, frankly, help you sleep at night.



  1. Do you have a formal policy on cross-training or backup? (Chapter: Human Resources, Communications, Business Operations, Revenue Operations, Facilities, IT)
  2. Do you have an annual marketing plan? (Chapter: Communications)
  3. Do you have a social media site(s) or website associated with your company? (Chapter: Communications, IT)
  4. Do you have a customer master list? (Chapter: Communications, Customers, Business Operations)
  5. Do you have a personal will(s) that mentions the company? (Chapter: Human Resources, Business Operations)
  1. Do you have a written business plan? (Chapter: Communications, Business Operations)
  2. Has your CPA approved of the financial separation of duties? (Chapter: Business Operations)
  3. Do you have a vendor list with key names and backups? (Chapter: Business Operations, Revenue Operations, Facilities, IT)
  4. Do you have an inventory equipment lists for: office, IT, production and warehouse?  Do your insurance agent & CPA have these lists? (Chapter: Communications, Business Operations, Revenue Operations, Facilities, IT)
  5. Do you have alarm systems? (Chapter: Business Operations, Revenue Operations, Facilities, IT)
  1. Do all of your ‘relationship agreements’ have Service Level Agreements (SLA)?
    • Have you reviewed all the SLAs to match your organization’s abilities?
    • Did you have opportunity to negotiate SLAs and have changes reflected in the “relationship agreement”?
    • Has your legal team reviewed your ‘relationship agreements’ prior to signing?

     

  2. Do you have all the regular contacts listed and available to all appropriate staff?
    • Where is the information?
    • Who has authority to contact the other organization?
    • What is the criterion for contacting the other organization?
  3. What is your organization’s communication plan with vendor/partners?
    • Regular communications with organizations with ‘active’ agreements?
    • If your organization is having a crisis, what is your Crisis communication plan?
    • As you are in recovery phase, what is your Recovery communication plan?
  4. What is the frequency for review or renewal of active agreements?
    • Who is involved?
    • What are the metrics or items for review?
  5. What are the audit metrics for each active agreement?
    • Who in your organization is monitoring?
    • What is the escalation process if metrics are not met or exceeded?
  1. Are penalties or rewards documented in the agreement?
  2. Are you invited to any desktop crisis response test with other organizations?
    • Do you invite other organizations to observe or participate in your tests?
    • Can you ask for an invitation to observe their crisis process?
    • Can you ask to participate in the exercise?
  3. What are the crisis trigger(s) for your organization?
    • Which will affect active agreements?
    • Do these coordinate with the crisis communication plan noted in Question #3?
  4. Are the crisis contacts at your vendor/partner organization different than noted in Question #2?
    • Are the contact numbers or method different than normal communications?
  5. Do your recovery plans include actions and communications with your vendor/partners with active agreements?
    • Does your recovery communication plan include past agreement holders and prospects?
  1. Do all of your ‘relationship agreements’ have Service Level Agreements (SLA)?
    • Have you reviewed all the SLA’s to match your vendor/partners abilities?
    • Did you have opportunity to negotiate SLAs and have changes indicated in ‘relationship agreement’?
    • Has your legal team reviewed the relationship agreements prior to signing?
  2. Do you have all the regular contacts listed and available to all appropriate staff?
    • Where is the information?
    • Who has authority to contact the other organization?
    • What is the criterion for contacting the other organization?
  3. What is your organization’s communication plan with vendor/partners?
    • Regular communications with organizations with ‘active’ agreements?
    • If your organization is having a crisis, what is your Crisis communication plan?
    • As you are in recovery phase, what is your Recovery communication plan?
  4. What is the frequency for review or renewal of active agreements?
    • Who is involved?
    • What are the metrics or items for review?
  5. What are the audit metrics for each active agreement?
    • Who in your organization is monitoring?
    • What is the escalation process if metrics are not met or exceeded?
  1. Are penalties or rewards documented in the agreement?
  2. Do you invite your vendor/partners to a desktop crisis response test?
    • Do you invite your vendor/partners to either observe or participate?
    • Do you ask for an invitation to observe or participate in their test?
    • Do you ask for their written response plan?
  3. What are the crisis trigger(s) for your organization?
    • Which will affect active agreements?
    • Do these coordinate with the crisis communication plan noted in Question #3?
  4. Are the crisis contacts at your vendor/partner organization different than noted in Question #2?
    • Are the contact numbers or method different than normal communications?
  5. Do your recovery plans include actions and communications with your vendor/partners with active agreements?
    • Does your recovery communication plan include past agreement holders and prospects?

If these questions are making bells go off in your head, or if you’ve had to answer “no” to any of them, move from thinking to doing. Take a look at our workbook and cut this task into doable reasonable pieces today. See a sample chapter here.